OPL Responds: I.C.E. in the Bay Area

Here's what you need to know to protect yourself or support friends and neighbors in the event of an I.C.E. raid in the Bay Area.

OPL Responds Logo

Recent reports that I.C.E. (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) descended on businesses in the Bay Area remind us how important it is to know your rights.  

The library can help you get the information you need to protect yourself, your family, and your neighbors. Ask us! If we don’t know the answer, we’ll connect you to someone who does.

Creative Commons photo by Joe

Click here to read more

10 Great Reasons to Read Fiction in February 2018

If you're a fiction lover, here are ten great February arrivals for you to drool over.

Click here to read more

African Americans in Times of War: The Story of We Also Serve

In honor of this year’s Black History Month theme, “African Americans in Times of War,” the African American Museum & Library at Oakland will feature events and community blog posts in February that tell the stories African Africans’ valiant and brave contributions to our country both at home and abroad in war time.

World War II brought profound changes to the African American community in Oakland and across the Bay Area. In the first four years of the war, the African American population of Oakland bloomed from 8,462 in 1940 to 21, 770 by 1944 to a considerable 47,562 residents by 1950.  Some families were beckoned to the Bay Area by government recruiters that scoured the South and Midwest looking for workers to fill the manpower shortage in war industries caused by the war. But most families moved here based on word of mouth from family members and Pullman Porters who touted the area’s plentiful jobs, good wages, and better opportunities for families seeking to escape the brutal social conditions of the American South. Most African Americans migrants came from four states – Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma – and some referred to the trains out West as ‘Liberty trains.’ Economic opportunities for African Americans expanded exponentially following Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Executive Order 8802 prohibiting racial discrimination in hiring in federal war industries. Roosevelt was

Click here to read more

OPL Responds: A Booklist for the 2018 Women's March

Need some reading to go with all that marching? OPL has lots of great books on topics such as suffrage, civic engagement, dissenting women, and women in politics.

Saturday, January 20th will be the second annual Oakland Women's March.

Last year the Mercury News reported that 100,000 people marched here in Oakland. The route goes right by the Main library! We hope to have power restored and be open. If you are planning to visit the library on Saturday, please be aware that parking, and even walking, in the area may be difficult. If we are not open, we will have a table outside the library where you can pick up booklists, flyers, and even do a fun craft.

If you're marching (or if you're interested in reading more about issues being highlighted by the march) we've pulled together some books you might want to take a look at. 

Suffrage

Click here to read more

African Americans in Times of War

Black History Month 2018 focuses on African Americans in Times of War. Join us for events every Saturday in February as we honor veterans of various wars.

                                                                                

This years’ Black History Month theme is African Americans in Times of War.  The African American Museum and Library at Oakland [AAMLO] is commemorating this every Saturday in the month of February with programs honoring our veterans.

Saturday February 3 “Black Warriors, The Buffalo Soldiers of World War II”

Saturday February 10 “Finding Our Place: The Oakland Black Veteran Experience”

Saturday February 17 “Col. Charles Young and the Buffalo Soldiers at the Presidio”

Saturday February 24 “Why We Fight”

African Americans have served our country with pride for centuries in the

Click here to read more

E.J. (Evangeline) Montgomery: Oakland African American artists' advocate

The African American Museum & Library at Oakland celebrates an arts champion.

Portrait of Evangeline J. Montgomery (1973)Oakland Post Photograph Collection, MS 169, African American Museum and Library at Oakland, Oakland Public Library. Oakland, California.

E.J. (Evangeline) Montgomery, who had been active in the Los Angeles art networks in the 1950s and 1960s, moved to Oakland in 1965 and by 1967 had founded an African American artists' advocacy group called Art West Associated North (AWAN). Like other political organizations concerned with African American visibility and self-definition, the association protested the exclusion of African American artists from local museums and galleries. In a note published in the exhibition catalog "

Click here to read more

10 Great Reasons to Read Fiction in January 2018

What better way to say Happy New Year than with a list of great novels being released this January? Here's our monthly list of great fiction titles arriving soon.

Cover of Halsey StreetCover of The Wedding DateCover of WinterCover of A State of Freedom

Click here to read more

OPL Responds: The Legalization of Recreational Cannabis Use

Prop 64 is in Effect, Smoke ‘Em if You Got ‘Em

Recreational cannabis use is now legal in the state of California!

But what does that really mean?

Oakland librarians are happy to answer your reference questions, or you can go directly to some of these sources:

Curious about the specifics of legality? Need health information?

Let’s Talk Cannabis

The California Department of Public Health shares science-based information about cannabis and how it affects our bodies, minds and health. It also provides quick bulleted info about the new law:

  • Under California law, adults 21 or older can use, carry, and grow cannabis (marijuana, weed, pot).

Click here to read more

Calling All Immigrant Artists!

Apply Now! The Immigrant Artist Mentoring Program: Oakland offers immigrant artists the opportunity to focus on their creative practice, gain support and exposure for their work, while upholding their distinct cultural identities.

Photo of artistsThe Oakland Public Library is excited to be a partner in an exciting new program being brought to our city by the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA).  The Immigrant Artist Mentoring Program: Oakland offers immigrant artists the opportunity to focus on their creative practice, gain support and exposure for their work, while upholding their distinct cultural identities.

Apply Here button

NYFA has developed a method that has proved successful in helping artists access resources, build networks and develop skills, as well

Click here to read more

Our Favorite Books of 2017

OPL staff look back on their favorite books of 2017.

When the new year prompts you to look back on the previous twelve months, at least you can always count on good books. Here are a few of our favorites published in 2017.

Click here to read more