The Return of the Native by Thomas Hardy, Notes from the Lakeview Book Club

The Return of the Native by Thomas Hardy, Notes from the Lakeview Book Club

We started with a few interesting facts about Thomas Hardy, who like the "Native" in his novel, loved his "heath" wilderness and rual community more than any other place he could choose to live. Hardy has said that he never wanted to grow up. He wanted to stay in the world he lived in when he was 6 years old. Many can relate to that from time to time.

Thomas Hardy was born in 1840 and died in 1928. He lived 88 years! During those years life changed drastically in his world, with major industrialization, the changes brought to rural life. The major big thinkers, Freud, Marx, Darwin, Einstein changed the world. Two major authors of his time were Mark Twain and Charles Dickens.
For a person who loved his roots, his wilderness, his neighbors, the outside world was alien to him. This was a theme in this wonderful classic. Hardy's wife was probably very much like Eustasia, strong willed, beautiful and someone

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Play with your Words

A list of recommended word play books available at the Oakland Public Library.

Kids love to play, and librarians love to see kids playing with words! Visit your local library to find these books full of palindromes, puns, spoonerisms, homophones, and much more. And let us know in the comments if we missed any of your favorites!

CDB book cover

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Sean's Shadows

Asian Pacific Islander Heritage Month celebrations at Oakland Public Library

Sean's Shadows brings shadow puppet stories from all over the world. This month we celebrate Asian Pacific Islander Heritage Month with two stories from China: Fool me Once and Bloom Tree. After each performance he shows and demonstrates musical instruments he used during the show.

Join us.  

Martin Luther King, Jr. Tuesday, May 20 at 4:00 PM

Dimond  Tuesday, May 20 at 7:00 PM

West Oakland Wednesday May 21 at 10:30 AM

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We Keep Finding Stuff!

More found objects - some art, some notes, and an amazing rejection letter.

Here are some more items found in library books (or in the library)!   We've got some good ones today!

But first- I've gone a bit "Found Item" crazy lately and have made some buttons and magnets created out of the items we've found and posted here!  So, look for me when the library is out and about (Nerd Nites, for example).  I'll bring these along and you can have one for your very own with a teeny small donation to our amazing wonderful supportive Friends of the Oakland Public Library.

For now, let's check out some items...

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Friends?

Dear Nathan.  This is probably my favorite find ever.  Sorry, Nathan.

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10 Great Reasons to Read Fiction in May

Looking for your next great read? Here are ten terrific novels coming out in May.

Book CoverBook coverBook coverBook cover

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DÍA: Great Kids' Books about Asian-Americans

Celebrate DIA, Diversity in Action, with these children's books featuring characters who are Asian or Asian-American.

Holy beans, what a DIA week it's been! The whole world is talking about how #WeNeedDiverseBooks. We hope you've enjoyed the pictures and comments from OPL. We take great pride in our beautiful city, one of the most diverse in the nation.

Now that we've seen how many people want diverse books.... the next step is to buy them. I know that may sound strange coming from a librarian--of COURSE I want you to check out books from our libraries. My dream is that one day I will walk into a library and there will be NOTHING LEFT on the shelves because everything is out there in your living rooms and on your nightstands. But for those times when you want to buy books for yourself or give them as gifts, take a look at the Diversify Your

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DÍA: Great Kids' Books about Differently Abled People

Celebrate DIA, Diversity in Action, with these children's books featuring characters who are differently abled.

Extra extra, bonus list! This afternoon, some great recent children's books about young people who live with disabilities. More on Pinterest!

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DÍA: Great Kids' Books about LGBTQ People

Celebrate DIA, Diversity in Action, with these children's books featuring characters who are LGBTQ.

 Whoa people, have you checked us out on twitter lately? Like yesterday or today? Tons of pictures and personal testimony in support of #WeNeedDiverseBooks --keep it coming for the rest of the week, will you? Take a picture of yourself holding a sign with your reasons why we need diverse books, then email it to sharon@mckellar.org (she's our community relations librarian!). We'll tweet it and you'll be a part of history.

Today, our series of awesome diverse children's books continues with books featuring characters who are lesbian \ gay \ bisexual \ transgender \ queer. As with this week's other post, you'll find lots more titles of note on

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DÍA: Great Kids' Books about Latinos

Celebrate DIA, Diversity in Action, with these children's books featuring Latino characters.

When I first started at OPL, I worked at the César Chávez Branch in the Fruitvale (non-Facebook link here) I could not have a bigger soft spot in my heart for this place. It's sunny, the floors are shiny, the colors inside the branch are radiant. The staff is friendly, and you can get the best veggie burrito in Oakland right across the street.

But for me? It was all about lunch breaks in the staff room with gorgeous old cartoons from Mexico. I dug way into the Spanish-language cartoon section, where there are books you won't find at any other library in Oakland. Also, since Chávez gets the best selection of Latin American DVDs, I brought home

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DÍA: Great Kids' Books about African Americans

Celebrate DIA, Diversity in Action, with these children's books featuring characters who are African-American.

There's lots of buzz right now (as there should be) about the numbers reported by the Cooperative Children's Book Center: of 3,200 children's books they received in 2013, just 93 featured African-American characters. Noted children's author Walter Dean Myers responded in a moving essay in the New York Times, in which he described his own childhood and coming to find himself in books. His son Christopher Myers, a noted children's author and illustrator himself, wrote a companion piece in which he lamented the fact that when African-American children appear in books, too often they "are limited to the townships of occasional historical books that concern themselves with the legacies of civil rights and slavery." 

Today, we

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