New Books by Local Authors

New books and local authors at OPL.

There's no shortage of creative talent in the Bay Area. Exciting new books by local authors are hitting the shelves and Oakland Public Library has copies for you to check out. Here are some new titles that I'm looking forward to reading and hope you will, too. All of these authors are making appearances at OPL branches so make sure to stop by and meet the people behind the books, ask questions, and learn more about the creative process.

Road Trips, a memoir by Tamim Ansary, recounts stories from his years as part of the American ‘60s and ‘70s counterculture, after he arrived from Afghanistan where he was born and raised. The book

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Our History is Our Strength

Women's History Month is a good month to read about women who made history.

In observance of Women’s History Month we bring you a short list of books on women who made important contributions to the fight for suffrage, in civil and human rights, and in science and mathematics. Read on.

Women achieved the right to vote in the United States in 1920 after a struggle almost as old as the nation itself. For a good overview of that movement, read With courage and cloth : winning the fight for a woman's right to vote by Ann Bausum. To learn more about the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention, birthplace of the American Woman Suffrage movement, read Seneca falls and the origins of the women's rights movement by Sally G. McMillen.

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10 Great Reasons to Read Fiction in March 2017

Looking for your next great read? Here are ten possibilities coming during the month of March.

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Immigrant Stories

A collection of books released in the last year dealing with the experience of U.S. immigrants.

During the past month, many U.S. immigrants have faced new challenges as a result of executive orders issued from the White House. As a nation of immigrants, we know that the immigrant experience is varied and unique. Listed below are books released in the last year that capture some of the unique experiences of what it means to be a U.S. citizen and/or an immigrant living in the U.S.

Nonfiction

The  Book of Isais    

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Good Books Come in Threes

Join us at the Main Library on February 26 when we'll be hosting three terrific writers and their new books.

On Sunday, February 26 the Main Library will hosting an author program featuring Bay Area novelists Vanessa Hua, Shanthi Sekaran, and Ali Eteraz, who all have new books out. They’ll be here to talk about and read from them with us.

Shanthi Sekaran’s new novel, Lucky Boy, concerns two women, one Indian-American, the other undocumented and from Mexico, and their love for the same baby boy. Infertility, adoption, and the rights of the undocumented are highlighted in this insightful story. Sekaran is also

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Truth, Lies and Quibblers: Media Literacy for a New Era

Don't Fall for Fake News. Your library offers workshops and resources to build media literacy.

Photo of newspaper from Harry Potter booksBefore fake news and alternative facts there was … The Quibbler and The Daily Prophet. Yes, I am talking about the wizarding world of journalism. Bear with me.

For those who skipped the Harry Potter series, The Quibbler was Rowling’s storyline about a tabloid complete with sensational headlines, paparazzi and misleading (even fake) stories. The Daily Prophet, on the other hand, shared government-sponsored news, replete with alternative facts and spin control from The Ministry of Magic.

Imagine if Harry Potter readers graduated to Book 7 having gained media literacy skills from the stories. Sadly, the books’ negative depiction of media is troubling – both because it’s based in some truth and because it’s incomplete, leaving readers with a near total distrust of journalism. Sound familiar?

Lest we

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fREADom at Oakland Public Library

Everyone is welcome at your Oakland Public Library! Read about various ways the library can support activists and activism and connect you to excellent resources and books.

Your public library is a place where, free of cost, you can learn about current issues from credible sources, explore history, borrow high quality books, and take advantage of community resources and spaces.  Everyone is welcome. Inclusiveness is a core value of public libraries. Oakland Public Library will be tabling at the second Oakland Peace Center Activism and Advocacy Resource Fair this coming Sunday, 2/12, from 11 to 4 PM, to promote how the library can help you during these tumultuous times. You can sign up for a library card and pick up various resources and reading lists as well as limited edition “fREADom” buttons!

Reading is among our greatest freedoms; OPL librarians have curated these timely book lists. Click through to learn more about:

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10 Great Reasons to Read Fiction in February 2017

Here's looking forward to the arrival of these 10 fiction titles this month!

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Social Movements and Activism

Interested in learning about political organizing? Check out these new books at OPL.

This past week citizens in the Bay Area and throughout the world expressed their opinions by participating in marches and protests. Resistance movements have been a way for people to voice their dissent throughout history. If you want to read about social movements and political organizing look no further than OPL. We have many new books on the topic. 

If you're interested in learning about a local movement in which civic engagement resulted in positive change, join Steve Early at the Piedmont Branch Library on Tuesday evening, February 28th at 6:30 PM for a discussion of his book about Richmond, California -- Refinery Town: Big Oil, Big Money and the Remaking of an American City.

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Black History Homework

Get your students Black History Homework books asap! Supplies are limited!

Library Kid:   I have the hardest person EVER!!!!

Me: Who? 

Library Kid: I'll never find annnnnnything on herrrr... 

Me: Who?

Library Kid: Fannie Lou Hamer. 

Me: What about this book?  ( I pulled it out of our newly created Black History Books Display) 

Library Kid:  

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