Oakland Public Library's 2018 Gift Guide

Giving a gift to a book lover anytime soon? Our fourth annual Gift Guide features some of our favorite recent books for kids, teens and adults.

It's that time of year again!  You are looking for ideas for gifts, and we are full of ideas about books!  This is our FOURTH annual Gift Guide and we are excited to share it with you.

Our list this year has some amazing gems for children, teens, and adults and we hope to help you fufill all your gift giving duties with it this winter.  Please think about supporting your local bookstores and all the wonderful readers in your lives by giving them these recent books that are some of our personal favorites.  

Children’s Books for ages 0-5

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Trans Day of Remembrance

Today, we remember and celebrate all transgender individuals whose lives were taken because of anti-trans violence, prejudice, and hate crimes.

OPL logo with trans flag

Today, November 20th, is the Transgender Day of Remembrance (#TDoR). According to the official TDoR website, TDoR was established in 1999 by Gwendolyn Ann Smith to honor Rita Hesler and all other trans* people who have died from anti-trans hate crimes and violence.

Although recent events have brought the ways the federal government (and other levels of government) define and choose to recognize

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Living on Ohlone Land

While many Americans celebrate Thanksgiving, it is crucial to remember the rich history of the Native peoples of this land and the atrocities committed by colonial and settler forces in attempts to erase their humanity, culture, and survival.

(photo by San Francisco Trail Project on Flickr)

Have you ever driven on Shellmound Street or shopped at the shopping centers along it in Emeryville? Ever wondered where that name came from?

Last week, Corinna Gould delivered a powerful talk about Living on Ohlone Land at the Golden Gate Branch (view the video playlist here). Ms. Gould is the spokesperson for the Confederated Villages of Lisjan/Ohlone, the

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Frederick Roberts: California's First African American Legislator

In honor of election day the African American Museum and Library at Oakland profiles political figure Frederick Madison Roberts.

      

Today is Election Day in the United States of America. Your vote counts. On this Election Day, the African American Museum and Library at Oakland profiles political figure Frederick Madison Roberts. Roberts was born in Chillicothe, Ohio in 1880 to Andrew J. and Ellen Wales Roberts. From his mother, he acquired the distinction of being the great-grandson of Sally Hemings, a woman reputed to be the mistress of Thomas Jefferson.

There were two milestones in Roberts’ distinguished life. First, Roberts was the first African American to graduate from Los Angeles High School. He went on to attend the University of Southern California for one semester and then transferred to Colorado College, where he received an A.B. in legal studies. He also served in his first civic office, acting as deputy assessor of El Paso County, Colorado.

             

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International Games Week & Month @ OPL!

Are you a gamer? Did you know that International Games Week is November 4-10, 2018? Luckily, you can play all month long at OPL.

Image of black and white dice

International Games Week is November 4-10, 2018. Whether you're into video games or old-fashioned board games, we've got fun events for you, your friends, and your family all month long!

Thursday 11/1

Wii U Super Smash Bros. Preliminary Tournament @ Dimond Branch

Saturday 11/3

Super Smash Bros Preliminary Tournament

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Halloween & Día de los Muertos @ OPL!

If you love spooky season and/or celebrate Día de los Muertos, we've got you covered with fun events for all ages!

Wednesday 10/31

Halloween Family StorytimeImage of spooky pumpkin

We're having a special (sorta-)spooky storytime! Gather 'round the campfire and get ready to giggle and shriek at tales of toddler-friendly terror. We will sing and dance and then do a pumpkin craft.

Recommended for ages 3-7, but all of your family is welcome.

Wednesday, October 31st, 10:30am @ Elmhurst Branch

 

 

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Remembering Ida L. Jackson [1906-1996] A Reflection by Sean Dickerson

Historic Prescott School turns 150 in 2019 and to help celebrate AAMLO will be occasionally blogging about the school's history. Sean Dickerson begins this week with the story of Ida Louise Jackson, Oakland’s first African American teacher, who taught at Prescott starting in 1925.

 

 

On the anniversary of Ida L. Jackson's birth (October 12, 1902), AAMLO celebrates her commitment to progress and empowerment through education.

In 1921, while attending U.C. Berkeley (at the time one of only eight African American women students), Jackson founded the Rho Chapter of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, the oldest Greek-letter society for African American women in the United States. After being told by the Oakland Public School system that she would need more education, she returned to U.C. Berkeley, earning her Master's degree in 1923. After earning her Master's degree, Jackson was again denied a position with Oakland Public; this time they told her she required more teaching experience. With this in mind, Jackson moved to the Imperial Valley, and began teaching at East Side High School in El Centro, California, where parents of minority children had

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Celebrate Labor Day with the 93rd Anniversary of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters

The African American Museum and Library at Oakland recognizes the contributions of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters this Labor Day Weekend.

This week marks the 93rd Anniversary of the founding of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters.  Unions have played a significant role in providing protections for American people. However, some unions, such as the American Federation of Labor refused to let African Americans be a part of their unions. As a result, African Americans found it difficult to find work in certain occupation. Without union representation, union jobs would not hire them as workers.

During the 19th century, one of the biggest corporations in America was the Pullman Company. George Pullman developed the idea of having a luxury train service where passengers could get to and from their destinations in less cramped, uncomfortable conditions. Pullman’s idea was to use the services of African Americans to serve as servants on the trains. He believed that African Americans would work as servants because they were used to

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10 Things You Can Do With Your Library Card

There are so many things you can do with your library card besides checking out books. For many of them, you don't even have to come to the library!

Did you know that it's officially Library Card Sign-up Month?  Yes, there is a month for everything!  Hear me out, though, if you don't already have a library card (or even if you do), cause library cards do more than you know!

1. Stream a Movie, TV Show or Music

With hoopla and a library card you can not only read eBooks (without holds lists), listen to audiobooks, and read graphic novels, but you can also watch popular movies, listen to great music, and 

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Congratulations to KDIA on its induction to the Bay Area Radio Hall of Fame

AAMLO recognizes radio station KDIA and its induction into Bay Area Radio Hall of Fame

Congratulations to radio station KDIA for its recent induction into the Bay Area Radio Hall of Fame as the 2018 Legendary Station. KDIA has been a staple of the bay area African American music scene for over 50 years. However, there was a time when African American music was not played on Bay Area airways.

Prior to World War II, there were not radio stations featuring only African American music, and as late as 1947, and well into the early fifties, it continued with musical formats that reinforced racist stereotypes mocking Black culture. Formats began to change as a direct result of the unanticipated impact of a growing Black listening audience coupled with its significantly increased political and economic clout. Jazz, rhythm and blues and gospel music were now being played.

KDIA Lucky 13 debuted in 1959 when Egmont Sonderling,

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