"Nevertheless She Persisted" Women's History Month 2018

Celebrating Phenomenal Women During Women's History Month

By Marco Frazier - Library Assistant

African American Museum and Library at Oakland

 

“Nevertheless She Persisted” is the national theme for Women’s History Month 2018. The theme honors women who have fought against discrimination throughout history. African Americans women have carried the scarlet letter of discrimination for being both women and African American. The Archives Department at the African American Museum and Library at Oakland has many collections and interviews that highlight the trials, tribulations and triumphs that resulted from women fighting for equal rights.

                             

Click here to read more

If it’s not a data breach…

Learn more about Facebook and privacy in this latest post by our Digital Safety Team.

OPL Digital Safety Team 

If you’ve been reading the news in the past couple of weeks, chances are that you’ve heard of the Cambridge Analytica Files scandal and information in 50+ million Facebook profiles that were used to influence political elections. We’ve written about data breaches and how to recover from identity theft when Equifax was hacked back in September 2017, but this was not a data breach. If it’s not a data breach or “leak,” then what is it?

Turns out, the scandal isn't because Facebook did anything illegal but because it was legally able to sell or share your information to third parties (businesses

Click here to read more

Poetry Month at Oakland Libraries

And it was at that age ... Poetry arrived in search of me -Pablo Neruda

Join us at libraries all over Oakland as we celebrate "language at its most distilled and most powerful" (Rita Dove), "eternal graffiti written in the heart of everyone" (Lawrence Ferlinghetti) and "making the private world public" (Allen Ginsberg).

April is ... poetry month. 

Events for Adults

Blackout Poetry
Repurpose the pages of old books & magazines into poetic works of art! Intended for adults but welcomes teens and kids ages 8+. Supplies provided.
▸Golden Gate Branch, April 3, 6pm

Bi-Ku: Bike Haiku and More with the Women Bike Book Club
Read and discuss bike related poetry. Everyone is welcome to attend and participate in discussing bikes and feminism in a WTF friendly (but not exclusive) space.
▸Golden Gate Branch, April 5, 6 pm

Click here to read more

New Nonfiction

Spring nonfiction releases.

New spring nonfiction titles are arriving at OPL. Here are some that will soon be landing on the shelves and can be placed on hold. 

Look Alive Out There     What Truth Sounds Like     The Gift of Our Wounds     


Click here to read more

Elizabeth Scott Flood: Early Oakland Educator

In honor of Women's History Month, we introduce Elizabeth Scott Flood who championed education for Oakland's children of color in the 19th century.

One of Oakland's earliest educators was a woman born in the East but who dramatically changed the racial composition of California schools. Elizabeth Thorne Scott Flood was born free in 1828 in the state of New York. She was educated in New Bedford, Massachusetts, a town known for its political activism. She married Joseph Scott and together they emigrated to California during the Gold Rush and settled in Placerville. Her husband, who worked as a gold miner, died shortly after their arrival, leaving Elizabeth to raise their young son Oliver alone. In the early 1850s she and Oliver moved to Sacramento which had a sizable African American population. When Oliver was barred from attending the local public school, Elizabeth responded by establishing a private school in her home to educate her son and other African American children. This school opened on May 29, 1854. Elizabeth was paid $50 a month by the parents of her pupils. Before long, she was also welcoming Native American and Asian American children into her school.

The following year the

Click here to read more

Read to a Dog!

Children can practice reading to a certified therapy dog in the library.

Girl reading to a dog

Dogs in the Library? Well, sure, when they're working!

Young readers can read aloud to a certified therapy dog who loves listening to stories! Reading to dogs can help increase children's reading confidence, skill, and enjoyment. 

Read to a Dog events are hosted at the following locations/times.  Please call in advance of your planned day to make sure the dog is expected.  Dogs take vacations too sometimes.  

Scout the Dog is ready for a story at:

Elmhurst Library, Every Saturday at 11am

Natasha the Dog is ready for a story at:

81st Avenue Library, First Wednesday of the month at 2pm

Rockridge

Click here to read more

OPL Responds: Mass Shootings, Community Violence, and School Safety

We’ve compiled a list of resources that will cover grief/fear/trauma, speaking to your children about traumatic events, gun laws, advocacy, and safety info. We hope you find this helpful.

OPL Responds Logo

After last month’s tragic shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, FL, student activists brought the gun debate to a national level by pressuring lawmakers to make changes.

There are many different aspects attached to the mass community violence that have been dominating the national and local news for decades. What do you need to know? We’ve compiled a list of resources that will cover grief/fear/trauma, speaking to your children about traumatic events, gun laws, advocacy, and safety info. We hope you find this helpful.

   

Parents & Caregivers: Talking to Children about Traumatic Events

When getting ready to speak to your children about these issues, it is important to remember that everybody processes grief and traumatic events differently. Here are some resources that provide helpful tips on this delicate subject:

  • NPR, with help from the

Click here to read more

10 Great Reasons to Read Fiction in March 2018

Here are ten of the many great books headed to the library this month.

Click here to read more

The Black Arts Movement in Oakland and Berkeley

The Black Arts Movement was a vibrant creative period that has had a lasting cultural impact on the East Bay.

Ever so often a social and political movement merges with an arts movement to create a uniquely vibrant environment that impacts communities for generations. The Black Arts Movement that began in 1967, and reached its zenith in the early 1980s, was such a cultural moment in this country. Two social/political movements would greatly impact the decade: African independence and American Civil Rights. As the Civil Rights Movement in America grew to gain international attention, young and creative people took an increasingly more active role. Their study and acceptance of Pan-Africanism, their identification with the words of Malcolm X and James Baldwin, and their ardent call for Black Power shifted the movement from a conciliatory call for justice to a more forceful call to political action and radical self-determination. Local artists responded by embracing African cultures, rhythms, and design motifs. This was exemplified in their dress, hairstyles, art themes, writing, and performance.

As the Black Arts Movement grew, galleries and cultural centers

Click here to read more

AAMLO Celebrates Women's History Month

The African American Museum & Library at Oakland is proud to announce its speakers series, "Extraordinary Women, Extraordinary Times" in honor of this year's Women's History Month. Please join us each Saturday in March at 2:00 p.m. for an discussion with an engaging series of speakers.

Lise Pearlman, Saturday March 3

Considered the country’s leading expert on the 1968 Huey Newton death penalty trail in Oakland, Ms. Pearlman studied law at Boalt Hall, UC Berkeley, and practiced law in Alameda County. She appeared in the acclaimed 2015 documentary, “The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution,” and she will be signing copies of her new book, With Justice For Some: Politically Charged Criminal Trials in the Early 20th Century That Helped Shape Today’s America.

Careth Reid, Saturday March 10 

Ms. Reid is a native of Berkeley and a lifelong educator and champion of community service in the Bay Area. She is a recipient of the San Francisco State University “Alumna of the Year” award and an inductee in the university’s Hall of Fame. She will be signing copies of her book, The Picture Man: From the Collection of Bay Area Photographer E.F. Joseph, 1927 – 1979 which she wrote with co-author, dance legend, and Oakland native, choreographer, Ruth Beckford.

Halifu Osumare, Saturday March 17

A participant and

Click here to read more