Kids Bike: A Booklist from the Women Bike Book Club

Books for kids who love bikes!

Did you know that the Oakland Public Library co-hosts a Women Bike Book Club with Bike East Bay? We gather to discuss biking, feminism, and the intersection of the two on the second Thursday of each month at 6:00pm, at our Golden Gate Branch (5606 San Pablo Avenue). The book club was started by Bike East Bay as part of their Women Bike initiative, which brings women and gender nonconforming folks together in social settings to share experiences and resources with each other. 

Ok so the book club sounds awesome but why are we talking about that here?

Our meeting on November 9th will focus on children’s books! We'll have some great selections of bike-related children's literature, and we'll talk about moms, biking, and the next generation of cyclists. Join us to enjoy beautiful illustrations, good conversation, and maybe even pick up some gift ideas for the little feminists in your life. 

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Read a Good Ghost Story Lately?

Haunted stories for Halloween.

Looking for some ghostly reading as Halloween approaches? Check out these novels and shorts stories featuring ghosts. Some of the books contain traditional ghost stories; in others the authors use psychological hauntings as a motif. All are filled with spine-tingling suspense! Descriptions are provided by the publishers.

Image result     The Boy Who Drew Monsters     

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Mysterious Thelonious: Monk turns 100

Celebrate the 100th birthday of Thelonious Monk by listening, watching, reading, and playing.

Posted by Camille Peters

Thelonious Monk at the pianoThelonious Sphere Monk is of those rare public figures who is recognizable by silhouette alone. Elements of his trademark style are captured on the 1964 cover of Time magazine featuring Monk: the hat, the beard curling to a point. That Monk is one of only a handful of jazz musicians to ever appear on the cover of Time is a measure of his importance in jazz history.

Today marks the centennial for Monk, a pianist and composer with a reputation for originality and eccentricity. Born on October 10, 1917, Monk got his start as a performer in the early 1940s. He was the house pianist at Minton's Playhouse in Harlem

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10 Great Reasons to Read Fiction in October 2017

Here are 10 tough-to-resist fiction releases coming this month.

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What now?! Necessary steps to take after the Equifax Breach

The Equifax data breach in September affected about 143 million Americans; chances are you are one of them. Two members of OPL's Digital Safety Team explain the necessary steps to take after major data breaches.

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Picture: Taylor White on Flickr

By Andrea Guzmán and Ajoke Kokodoko - Digital Safety Team @ OPL

Though the adage “the best defense is prevention” still rings to be true when it comes to digital safety and privacy, there are particular situations--such as data breaches--where consumers have little control over how their data is protected. Data breaches have become so commonplace that the Federal Trade Commision even made a video called “Data Breaches and You” (watch it here). Such cases call for damage

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While You're Waiting For....

Louise Penny's latest has a super-long hold list. Here are some things you can read while you wait.

 Jacket.aspxGlass Houses, the new Chief Inspector Gamache mystery by Canadian author Louise Penny, is here and boy, does it have a long hold list! Gamache has legions of fans and this, the lucky thirteenth in the series, will not fail to satisfy. If you don’t already follow Gamache, start with the first one,

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James Baldwin and "The Price of the Ticket"

Writer James Baldwin's fiery prose and sharp critiques on American society resonate 30 years after his death

"Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced.”

--James Baldwin from "As Much Truth As One Can Bear" in The Cross of Redemption: Uncollected Writings 

James Baldwin was living comfortably and productively in France as a successful expatriate writer when the American Civil Rights Movement kicked into high gear in the early 1960s. Spurred by the violent repression of peaceful demonstrations, racial violence, and widespread job and housing discrimination in America, he returned home to witness for himself what was tearing America apart. He traveled throughout the country to engage student activists, religious and community leaders, and politicians to hear what they thought about the turbulent state of affairs. Most notably, Baldwin used his fame as a celebrated writer to speak out about racism and its corrosive effect on both its victims and perpetrators. It was during these years that he wrote one of his most famous works, "

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Connecting to the Natural World

Books that focus on our nature and our connection to each other.

Lately I've been asked for book recommendations that inspire a sense of hope or aren't all about "everything that's wrong with the world." I've recommended books about social justice movements and change and ways of building community. I've also been thinking about other types of books that inspire hope. For me, nature writing can instill hopefulness because it helps me feel connected to the natural world which in turns reminds me of our interconnectedness. The books below all address our connection to nature and to each other. I hope you enjoy these recommendations.

The Abundance 

The abundance : narrative essays old and new

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We Love Nerds

Have you always wanted to spend an evening in a bar with library staff, enjoying lectures by local experts?

Join us for Nerd Nite East Bay 57: Animal Maps, Industrial Zone Art, Nature Myths.

We’re happy to provide reading lists based on the topics of the night’s lectures. Here’s a taste of this month:

To accompany Oliver Uberti’s talk entitled, "Where the Wild Things Go, Using Modern Technology to Map Nature’s Elusive Animals", we suggest you read his book, Where the Animals Go.

Liam O’Donoghue and Joey Enos’ will discuss "Art of the Emeryville Mud Flats". If you'd like to learn more, we suggest

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Climate Change & Community: a science cafe series

How will climate change affect us here in the Bay Area? Learn more about resilience and adaptation strategies from local experts at this 3-part series.

How do climate change and severe weather events affect our lives in the Bay Area?

How do we become stronger, smarter, and more resilient?

The Oakland Public Library is one of fifty libraries nationwide to host a reading, viewing, and discussion program on climate change, called Pushing the Limits: PLACE (Public Libraries Advancing Community Engagement). Come to the Golden Gate Branch to explore adaptation strategies and building resiliency at this "science-cafe-meets-book-club."

At each meeting, we will view a short video and learn from local organizations playing active roles in adapation and resilience. We will also discuss the book "Being the Change: Live Well and Spark a Climate Revolution," by Peter Kalmus. Pick up a copy at Golden Gate.

To encourage the conversation and provide context, we are joined by Brian Garcia, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service serving the Bay Area. An expert in weather- and water-related impacts of our region, Brian partners with Emergency Managers in the area to help their communities

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