You and Your Baby @ the Library Pt. 1

At weekly library Baby Bounce programs, you can make new friends and learn best practices for getting your baby ready to read.

Being a brand new parent is a joyous but sometimes scary event.  After all, you have to pass a test to drive a car but no test is required to become a parent.  You want to do your best for your baby and that best is probably pretty sleep deprived right now.  But do not fear - the library is here to help you.

We offer baby storytimes every week.  These lapsit storytimes, called "Baby Bounces" are 15- minutes long and filled with gentle rhymes, songs and movement that will start your baby on the path to reading.  After each Baby Bounce, there is a play time with age-appropriate toys.  This is a great chance to get out of the house, stimulate your baby's brain, meet other babies and their caregivers, share information, and make new friends.  Check out our Baby Bounces at the following times and places: 

  •      Dimond Library.     3565 Fruitvale Ave.               Wed. @ 10:15 am
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Why Diversity Matters in Children's Books

A white paper from the Association for Library Service to Children demonstrates why diversity matters in books and programs for children. OPL will be featuring some favorite books with people of color and of different backgrounds and abilities next week as part of our "Dia" celebrations.

Kids at LibraryThe lack of people of color in children's books has been a recent  topic of discussion.  For those that want to understand the issue more, the Association of Library Service to Children (ALSC), a division of the American Library Association (ALA), has published a white paper on The Importance of Diversity in Library Programs and Material Collections for Children.  

The author, Jamie Naidoo Campbell, recognizes and demonstrates that children need both to see their own culture, and others' cultures, portrayed authentically in their media-rich environment:  

By the

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Q&A: Patrons ask; librarians answer: Or, occasionally – Young patrons gawp; librarians guess.

Q&A: Children's Librarians answer questions all day, every day, from children, parents, caregivers, and teachers. How do children learn to ask questions?

Q: My child is too shy to ask questions. I want him to be confident, and to ask for what he needs. How do I get him to ask you questions himself? Graphic from the ALA; National Library Week Logo - Lives change @ your library

A: Yes, it's our job – parents, caregivers, and librarians, working together – to model the interactions that we'd like young people to conduct independently someday. Your child is learning a million tiny things by simply observing you as you conduct yourself daily. With very little conscious effort, he's learning by watching what you do.

When you bring a young person to the library, show him (you may not need to tell him) how you wait your turn, make a friendly greeting, ask a question, clarify if we're on the right track or

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Día de los Niños / Día de los Libros - Children's Day / Book Day

Don't miss Día (Diversity In Action) activities at the Oakland Public Library.

We are celebrating Día de los Niños / Día de los Libros - Children's Day / Book Day all month long in Oakland. Juan Sanchez, entertainer extraordinaire, brings us joyous music from all over the world. He has a unique performing style full of warmth and humor that stresses audience participation and focuses on themes such as celebrating different cultures, peace building, respect, and self esteem. 

Each child attending a Dia event will receive a book to keep.  Join us:

Temescal   April 16 at 10:30 AM

Martin Luther King, Jr.   April

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Oakland Reads 2020 - A New Chance for Oakland Youth

Solution - increase the number of children reading at grade level by the end of third grade.

Did you know that only 42% of Oakland children read at a third grade level by third grade?  Did you know that only 33% of Oakland's socio-economically disadvantaged children read at grade level by the end of third grade? Did you know, further, that the ability to read at grade level by the end of third grade is a prime indicator of a child's likelihood of graduating from high school? 

Oakland Reads 2020 is an initiative of the Oakland Literacy Coalition, a group of service providers who believe that Oakland can double the number of third graders reading at grade level by 2020. 

There are four pillars that support

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Poems are Blooming at the Main Library in April

During April, experience poetry in its many forms and varieties at the Main Library.

Cover of Hickory Dickory Dock

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"Hickory, dickory, dock,

The mouse ran up the clock.

The clock struck one,

The mouse ran down,

Hickory, dickory, dock."

  

Did you know that "Hickory, Dickory, Dock," other nursey rhymes, and even many children's songs such as the "Itsy Bitsy Spider" are also poems?  April is one of my favorite months of the year because it's National Poetry Month, a time when we focus on appreciating poetry in its many, many forms.

This year, the entire Main Library, including the Children's Room

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People of Color Underrepresented in Children's Books

Nina Lindsay, Supervising Librarian for Children's Services at Oakland Public Library, continues the discussion for Monday's KQED Forum Program on the lack of diversity in children's books.

This post was originally going to be about "beauty" in children's books.  Inspired by Lupita Nyong'o's speech at the Black Women in Hollywood Luncheon, I wanted to talk about picture books that tell children they are beautiful in real ways, like My People, Me Frida,

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Q&A Patrons ask; librarians answer: My preschool daughter is obsessed with sparkly princess stories! Is it time to worry?

Q&A: Children's Librarians answer questions all day, every day, from children, parents, caregivers, and teachers. Princess picture books for preschool-age children are in demand at every branch - but what do parents really want to know?

Q:  My daughter wants even more books about princesses wearing beautiful, sparkly dresses. I would like her to read books about confident girls whose sense of self is built on their capabilities, dreams, and interests. Do Photo of princess dollsyou have any like that – or any in which the princess doesn’t marry the prince? 

A: Yes, there are princess stories that feminists can embrace! The trick is to find the ones that will please your daughter as much as they will feed your long-term character goals for her.  I would point you to the article by

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PAWS to Read at Lakeview

Your child can read to a dog! Bring her to our Lakeview Branch on April afternoons. Sign up is required.

Boy reading to dogIs your child shy about reading out loud? Does your child avoid reading at all? Join us on Wednesday afternoons in April. Therapy Pets in Oakland is bringing dogs to the Lakeview Branch to give your child a fun way to practice reading. These gentle dogs do not judge children; they only love them. 

Research has shows that children gain ease in reading when they read to dogs. And who wouldn't love being around these mellow dogs?

Sign up for 20-minute sessions by calling the branch (510 238-7344) or by dropping by.

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Moving On Up

A list of 2nd-4th grade level chapter books recommended by Oakland Public’s children’s librarians.

Next time you’re in the children’s area of your library, keep an eye out for the Moving Up and Series Paperback books. These are special sections where you can find beginning chapter books for kids who have graduated out of early readers. Books here typically feature wide margins, short chapters, lots of illustrations, and vocabulary appropriate for 2nd – 4th graders. Super popular books in these sections include Captain Underpants, Mercy Watson,

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