Reading, Talking, Singing, Writing and Playing Works

A new study found that attending storytimes in which reading, singing, talking, writing and playing with your child took place had a positive impact on the child's literacy levels.

picture of babyI recently returned from sweltering Las Vegas where the American Library Association Annual Convention was taking place.  One of the programs I attended looked at whether or not the five activities developed by Every Child Ready to Read 2 - reading, singing, talking, writing and playing with children aged 0-5 had a statistical impact on that child's literacy levels.  A research grant in Washington State looked at the literacy levels of kids who attended storytimes where those practices were modeled.  

The results?  Yes they do!  Children who attended library storytimes that incorporated those activities did have higher literacy rates.  Just another reason to come to the storytimes offered here at the library and practice these activities at home.

For more information about the study, check out: 

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Fun, Essential, and Free: Summer Reading

New research supports reading for fun, and reading by choice during the summer.

Girl with BooksThis new survey from Reading is Fundamental tells us that kids are spending 3 times as much time watching TV or playing video games then they are reading during the summer.  Even so, we know that Oakland kids are reading: so far, 1000 more kids are participating in Oakland's Summer Reading Challenge than at this time last year.  

A couple of bullets jump out to me from the report:

  • Last summer, children who read because they wanted to were twice as likely to read than children who read because they had to.
  • Parents who consider reading to be extremely or very important are twice as likely to have a child who reads every day

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WANT MORE CHOICES? TRY LINK+

With your Oakland Public Library card, you can request any LINK+ book that isn't available from OPL.

Guess how many books you have access to at OPL. Go ahead, guess. A million? 5 million? Go....higher. Yes, we do have over a million print titles in our collection and, with a service known as LINK+, an extension of our Interlibrary Loan service, you can choose from over 11 million print titles from participating public and academic libraries in the area.

Like Manga?  Link+ has 10,000 listings

Need textbooks?  Link+ has thousands

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Q&A: Patrons ask; librarians answer: How do I teach my child not to fear the dentist?

Q&A: Children's librarians answer questions from children, parents, caregivers, and teachers, all day, every day. Question of the day: I’m taking my son to the dentist. I don’t want him to have the same phobias I have! Do you have any great books that will put both of us at ease?

Q: Do you have any books about visiting the dentist?  It’s my son’s first trip to the dentist, and I don’t want him to have the same phobias I have!  Do you have any great books that will put both of us at ease?

A: Yes, as a matter of fact we do.  To quote Mr. Rogers, “Learning to take good care cover image of Mr. Rogers book Going to the Dentistof yourself is an important part of growing. No matter how much you grow, though, there will always be times when you’ll need help keeping your body healthy. That’s true for everyone – children and adults.” His is still my favorite book

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Are Your Children Bored this Summer? There's Lots to Do at the Library!

Nothing to do? Here's just a little of what's happening in the next 24 hours at the Oakland Public Library

Busy Bee Dogs at Dimond                    Germar the Magician at Rockridge
                                                                              and 81st Avenue    

                 

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Learn a language online this summer before your travels!

Learn a language online with Transparent Language - includes 81 languages to teach you listening, speaking, reading and writing.

If you're traveling abroad this summer and want to get some conversational mastery in your destination language, check out our online language learning resource called Transparent Language Online. If you're accessing the link from your home computer, you'll need to enter your library card number and PIN to get started. 

This program is fully interactive, and uses various multimedia activities to engage all four language skills, including listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The feature I like best is that you can download all the vocabulary from each section as a PDF so you can even study off-line. (If you're an ESL student, it also includes beginner English courses for speakers of other languages and an immersion course for intermediate level English learners.) You can also get this on your smartphone - just search for the Byki app to get started.

Of course, the library also has a number of DVDs, CDs and books to help

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Lakeview Book Club Update: The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson

This is a synopsis of the Lakeview Branch Library Book Club's discussion of The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson

The seven off us, including new member liked the book, even if it wasn't our typical type of book we usually choose to read. Not everyone finished it. A few thought it slowed down in the middle. We all found parts that made us really laugh, some of us more than others. There was a great deal of laughter during the meeting as we discussed some of the sillier and surprising elements.
 
One member thought the plot was predictable and the humor was because of the way the events were described. That member noted that the translator had to have been exceptionally good.
 
We wondered if Jonas Jonasson was really that funny in real life. (I figure he has to be.)
 
Mr. Jonasson, born in 1961, was a journalist who at one time owned a large publication, which he sold so he could write his novel. This novel has been

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Percy Jackson Read-Alikes

Recommended books for kids who love Rick Riordan’s Percy Jackson series.

Every day in the library, we meet young readers who just can’t get enough of Rick Riordan. The author’s exciting blend of reality and mythology has exploded in popularity, with kids clamoring for books in his Percy Jackson & the Olympians series, as well as his Kane Chronicles and Heroes of Olympus series. Riordan superfans who are hungry for more fantastical action and adventure may want to give these

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Your Library. Your Summer Reading. Your Book Reviews.

Here are some of the books YOU are reading this summer!

Are you participating in our Summer Reading Program yet?  Yes, I'm talking to you - you adult out there who thought summer reading was just for kids!  It's not, and there are prizes to be won!

Also, we want your book reviews...  if you post them on the website, they'll show up right here on the library's website.  Spread the word and help other library users find some new things to read.  Go straight on over to the book review form and let us know what we should (or shouldn't) read this summer.

Here are the reviews we've received so far...

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Krip-Hop Nation Bay Area tour comes to Oakland Public Library

Krip-Hop Nation is a worldwide organization that addresses the discrimination against disabled artists in mainstream hip-hop by publishing articles and hosting events, lectures, and workshops.

Musicians with disabilities have been in the spotlight for decades. Artists such as violinist Itzhak Perlman (polio), singer/songwriter Stevie Wonder (blindness), country singer Clay Walker (multiple sclerosis), percussionist Evelyn Glennie (deafness), and Def Leppard drummer Rick Allen (complete arm amputation): all are major recording artists. And then there is Leroy Moore, Jr., founder of Krip-Hop Nation.

Krip-Hop Nation is a worldwide organization that addresses the discrimination against disabled artists in mainstream hip-hop by publishing articles and hosting events, lectures, and workshops. Moore was first put in the spotlight in the early 2000s, when he coproduced and cohosted a three-part series on what he dubbed "Krip-Hop" on KPFA's Pushing Limits program, which focuses on news, arts, and culture from the disabled community. Moore, who sufffers from cerebral palsy, tirelessly advocates for hip-hop performing artists with disabilities.

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